About Osseo

Sewer & Water

Sewer & Water


Water & Sewer Services

Water, sanitary sewer, and storm sewer fees in Osseo pay operating, maintenance, and capital costs of these City owned services. These utilities are not operated for profit, and the fees only produce enough money to meet costs.

IMPORTANT: If you recently purchased your home, please contact City Hall to make sure there are no delinquent utility bills for your property. Although the previous owner will receive a final utility bill, utility bills are considered an obligation of the property and the final responsibility for payment lies with the current owner. By checking with City Hall, you may be able to assure yourself that the previous owner has paid his bill. If you have utility questions, please contact Teri Portinen by email or by phone at 763-424-6752.

2016 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT (DRINKING WATER REPORT:
The City of Osseo purchases its water from the City of Maple Grove. Each year, the water is tested to ensure safety and that all regulations are being met. You can obtain the 2016 Drinking Water Report for the City of Osseo by clicking here. Contact 763-425-5741 to request a paper copy or to ask questions about the report.


Online Payments

Click on the ONLINE PAYMENTS button to begin the online payment procedure.  

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Are you looking for more information on the new Online Payments procedures?  See more.


Sanitary Sewer

Sanitary sewer utility billing rates are based on quarterly water usage (winter quarter). The 2017 rates are as follows:

The base charge is $50.50 per quarter, with the rate per 1,000 gallons beyond 15,000 gallons at $9.72.


Storm Sewer

Storm sewer utility rates are based on Residential Equivalency Factors (REF). This is part of your quarterly utility bill from the City of Osseo. One REF represents the amount of runoff from a typical single family residential property, and single family properties less than 0.5 acres in size are assigned one REF. Larger single family properties and more intensively developed property, such as commercial or industrial, generate more runoff. These properties are assigned REFs based on the volume of runoff they generate.

The 2017 rate for storm water is $33.83 per REF per quarter


Keep our natural resources clean with proper lawn care

What does your yard have to do with water pollution? Believe it or not, your lawn care decisions can have a big impact on our local waterways, including Shingle Creek to the south, and the mighty Mississippi River to our west.

Many of us have had to mow our lawns more often during rainy periods in the summer. These heavy rains can also contribute to grass clippings ending up in storm water runoff. Also, grass clippings that are blown into the street eventually enter the street storm drain. Water in the storm drain is NOT treated like sewage and waste water. Instead, it flows directly into our waterways.

When lawn clippings, fertilizers, soil, leaves, or animal wastes are picked up by storm water runoff, they are carried directly to our local streams and lakes. All of these materials contain phosphorus. According to the U.S. EPA, phosphorus is one of the most troublesome pollutants in storm water runoff and is considered the primary cause of water quality problems in our lakes, ponds and streams.

Fertilizer: Good for grass, not for streams or sidewalks

Phosphorous is also found in fertilizer. You should apply only the amount of fertilizer your lawn needs. Not only will you save money by using less fertilizer, you will help protect the environment. A soil test will inform you of the amount of phosphorus in your soil and the appropriate application rate. Fertilizer applied to your streets or sidewalks will get into the nearest lake or stream. Phosphorous "fertilizes" algae just like it does grass, and when too much algae grows in our rivers, lakes and streams, fish and other animals cannot survive.

When you keep your grass clippings on the lawn and not in the street or gutter, you add free fertilizer to your lawn. Leaving your grass clippings on the lawn can reduce your lawn’s annual fertilizer needs, reduce your fertilizer costs and reduce water pollution.


Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)

This Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) has been prepared with the purpose of meeting the requirements of the NPEDS Phase II permit as outlined in the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency general permit and in the most recent modification to the Clean Water Act. The document describes the City's 5-year plan to meet each of the six minimum measures described by the permit.  




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Essential Services for Osseo Residents

Essential Services lists names of other utilities that serve residents and businesses in the City of Osseo.

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Minidazzle & Lunch with Santa

Fri., Dec. 1 - Minidazzle 6 - 8 pm; Sat., Dec. 2 - Lunch with Santa 11 - 1, Community Center